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Mot Dintroduction Dissertation Defense

KELLEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, GRADUATE DIVISION

Friday, April 06, 2018, 10:00 am
Business
Han, Yoonju
Essays on Dynamics of Consumers’ In-Store Shopping Behavior
Hudge Hall, Room 7301
Chair: Prof. Shibo Li, (812-855-9015)

Monday, April 23, 2018, 10:00 am
Business
Misra, Shekhar
Examining the Role of Marketing in Customer Value Creation and Firm Value Capture
Hodge Hall, Room 7301
Chair: Prof. Lopo Rego, (812-855-1202)

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, GRADUATE DIVISION

Monday, March 19, 2018, 8:45 am
Gender Studies
Jose, Aiyinikkal Mary Margaret Betsy
Queer Film Representations in India: From Reel Moments to Real Moments
Ballantine Hall, Room 622
Chair: Prof. Stephanie Sanders, (812-855-0101)

Monday, March 19, 2018, 1:30 pm
Cognitive Science
Motz, Benjamin
Expectations During the Perception of Auditory Rhythms
Psychology Building, Room 128
Chair: Prof. Aina Puce, (812-856-0417)

Monday, March 19, 2018, 2:15 pm
Psychology
Orczyk, John
CORTICAL GENE ACTIVATION FOLLOWING SENSORY DEPRIVATION IN RATS
Psychology Building, Room 230
Chair: Prof. Preston Garraghty, (812-855-9679)

Monday, March 19, 2018, 3:00 pm
English
Fippinger, Andrew
Ambivalent Feelings: Boredom, Anxiety, and Frustration in the Victorian Novel
Ballantine Hall, Room 442E
Chair: Prof. Ivan Kreilkamp, (812-855-6132)

Tuesday, March 20, 2018, 7:30 am
Psychology
Driskell, Sara
Neurophysiological studies of visual emotion perception of crowds
Psychology, Room 130
Chair: Prof. Aina Puce, (812-856-0417)

Wednesday, March 21, 2018, 11:00 am
Mathematics
Cyr, Justin
Stationary determinantal processes on Z^d and some existence results for SPDEs with Levy noise
Swain Hall East, Room 320
Chair: Prof. Russell Lyons / Prof. Roger Temam, (812-855-1645 / 812-855-8521)

Wednesday, March 21, 2018, 4:00 pm
Chemistry
Jiang, Jiajian
COOPERATIVE BEHAVIORS IN CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM NANOSYSTEMS: FROM P22 VIRAL CAPSID TO PLASMONIC NANOPARTICLES
Chemistry, Room 033
Chair: Prof. Peter Ortoleva, (812-327-1633)

Friday, March 23, 2018, 3:00 pm
Comparative Literature
Dragu, Ana Maria
Intermediality in the Early Avant-Garde (1900-1930): Collage and Montage
Ballantine Hall, Room 235
Chair: Prof. Jacob Emery, (812-855-3634)

Monday, March 26, 2018, 5:00 pm
Religious Studies
Andrews, Ashlee
The Home Shrine and The Transnational World: Agency and Feminine Labor in Bengali Hindu Women's Domestic Shrine Care
Sycamore Hall, Room 224
Chair: Prof. Rebecca Manring, (812-855-6756)

Wednesday, March 28, 2018, 4:00 pm
Chemistry
Martin, Erin
Environmental Remediation Through Electrochemical Reduction-Oxidation
Chemistry, Room 033
Chair: Prof. Dennis Peters, (812-855-9671)

Thursday, March 29, 2018, 3:30 pm
Cognitive Science
Xu, Tian
Intelligence with Interaction: Understanding Coordinated Behaviors with Developmental, Computational and Robotic Approaches
Psychology, Room 230
Chair: Prof. David Crandall / Prof. Chen Yu, (812-856-1115 / 812-856-0838)

Friday, March 30, 2018, 2:00 pm
Economics
Klein, Michael
Essays on Intellectual Property Protection, Foreign Direct Investment, and Economic Growth
Wylie Hall, Room 225
Chair: Prof. Gerhard Glomm, (812-855-6160)

Friday, March 30, 2018, 3:00 pm
Near Eastern Languages & Cultures
Bevers, Michael
Islam, Globalization, and Modernity: Approaching Global Ethics through the Works of Taha Abderrahmane
Global and International Studies, Room 2015
Chair: Prof. Asma Afsaruddin, (812-856-7347)

Monday, April 02, 2018, 11:00 am
Political Science
Schon, Justin
Bullets, Bombs, and Conversations: How civilians make their migration decisions during conflict
Woodburn Hall, Room 218
Chair: Prof. Karen Rasler, (812-345-1855)

Monday, April 02, 2018, 4:45 pm
Political Science
Israelsen, Shelliann
Gender in Conflict: A Dynamic Theory of Ethnonationalist Armed Groups' Recruitment and Non-Recruitment of Female Combatants
Woodburn Hall, Room 218
Chair: Prof. Karen Rasler, (812-855-6308)

Tuesday, April 03, 2018, 4:00 pm
Cognitive Science; Psychology
Sherrin, Steven
Have I walked a mile in your shoes? The role of prior experiences in intergroup perspective taking
Psychology, Room 128
Chair: Prof. Selma Sabanovic / Prof. Eliot Smith, (812-856-0386 / 812-856-0196)

Wednesday, April 04, 2018, 3:00 pm
French
Lerme, Loic
Melusine, Medusa, and the Mermaid: Scaly Ladies and Monstrous Esthetics in 19th- and early 20th-century French Literature
Indiana Memorial Union, Maple Room
Chair: Prof. Nicolas Valazza, (812-855-5764)

Thursday, April 05, 2018, 1:30 pm
Mathematics
Nie, Hongming
Iteration at the boundary of Newton maps
Rawles Hall, Room 127
Chair: Prof. Kevin Pilgrim, (812-855-3477)

Thursday, April 05, 2018, 2:00 pm
Anthropology
Dennis, Evan
ADAPTATION TO SOCIAL ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM SHOCKS: TRANSFORMATION IN SAN DIEGO’S WATER INSTITUTIONS AND CULTURE BETWEEN 1990 AND 2010
Student Building, Room 159
Chair: Prof. Eduardo Brondizio, (812-855-8162 )

Thursday, April 05, 2018, 3:30 pm
Cognitive Science / Psychology
Fraune, Marlena
Examining Effects of Groups and Intergroup Contexts on Human-Robot Interaction
Luddy Hall, Room 1019
Chair: Prof. Selma Sabanovic / Prof. Eliot Smith, (812-856-0386 / 812-856-0196)

Friday, April 06, 2018, 10:00 am
Evolution, Ecology, & Behavior
Sylvia, Kristyn
MODULATION OF THE NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEM, GUT MICROBIOME, AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR
Simon Hall, Room 001
Chair: Prof. Gregory Demas, (812-856-0158)

Friday, April 06, 2018, 1:00 pm
Spanich
Gardner, Nora
Clean Up Duty: Dirt, Disorder and Narrative in Postwar Spain
School of Global and International Studies, Room 3134
Chair: Prof. Reyes Vila-Belda, (812-856-1057)

Friday, April 06, 2018, 1:00 pm
French
Root, Jamie
Des fois ca dit des mots en anglais et en francais meles: On the Variable Morphosyntactic Integration of English-Origin Lexical Verbs in Louisiana French
School of Global & International Studies, Room 1112
Chair: Prof. Kevin Rottet, (812-855-6164)

Friday, April 06, 2018, 2:00 pm
History
Johnson, Maxwell
A Dominant Subdivision of the Mighty Republic: Los Angeles Elites and the Contested Politics of Connection, 1890-1945
Ballantine Hall, Room 704
Chair: Prof. Michael McGerr, (812-855-6113)

Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 2:00 pm
Religious Studies
Cooper, Travis
The Digital Evangelicals: Contesting Authority and Authenticity after the New Media Turn
Student Building, Room 159
Chair: Prof. Candy Brown / Prof. Anya Royce, (812-855-3531 / 812-855-0248)

Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 3:00 pm
Communication & Culture
Barker, Cory
Second Screen Strategies: The Resilience of Television in the Social TV Era
Franklin Hall, Room 230M
Chair: Prof. Barbara Klinger, (812-320-5878)

Thursday, April 12, 2018, 9:00 am
Italian
Gemmani, Lucia
The Materiality of Battle: Warfare between Fiction and Reality in Italian Renaissance and Baroque Literature, Music and Theater
Indiana Memorial Union, Persimmon Room
Chair: Prof. Marco Arnaudo, (812-855-1088)

Thursday, April 12, 2018, 11:00 am
Economics
Nelson, Jaeger
The Impact of Social Security Programs on Households and the Macroeconomy
Wylie Hall, Room 225
Chair: Prof. Gerhard Glomm, (812-855-7256)

Thursday, April 12, 2018, 11:00 am
History
Coleman, Rachel
Give Me My Child Back: Evangelical Attitudes Toward Public Education in Twentieth Century America
Ballantine Hall, Room 704
Chair: Prof. Michael Grossberg, (812-855-3882)

Monday, April 16, 2018, 2:00 pm
Biochemistry
Fang, Mingxu
Redox, light and stringent responses in Rhodobacter capsulatus
Simon Hall, Room 001
Chair: Prof. Carl Bauer, (812-855-6595)

Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 11:00 am
Fine Arts - Art History
Domenes-Danes, Maria
Art-chive Production in Post-war Lebanon
Radio-Television Center, Room 322
Chair: Prof. Michelle Facos, (812-855-9390)

Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 1:00 pm
Chemistry
Logan, Kaitlyn
Metal-Catalyzed Stereoselective Alkene Carboboration
Simon Hall, Room 001
Chair: Prof. M. Kevin Brown, (812-856-9114)

Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 9:00 am
Physics
Daugherty, Sean
Neutron Interactions on Xe-136 and Their Impact on Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Searches
Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, North Large Conference Room
Chair: Prof. Mike Snow, (812-855-3881)

Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 4:15 pm
Political Science
Wonder, Thomas
Nationalism in Authoritarian Regimes: Activists, the Public and Institutions in Russia 2000-16
Woodburn Hall, Room 220A
Chair: Prof. Regina Smyth, (812-856-2822)

Friday, April 20, 2018, 12:00 pm
Mathematics
Lam, Wai Kit
Topics in critical and first-passage percolation
Rawles Hall, Room 127
Chair: Prof. Michael Damron / Prof. Russel Lyons, (404-894-4311 / 812-855-1645)

Friday, April 20, 2018, 2:00 pm
Economics
Chen, Meng-Wei
Essays on Chinese fiscal federalism and regional economics
Wylie Hall, Room 225
Chair: Prof. Michael Alexeev, (812-855-7103)

Friday, April 20, 2018, 4:30 pm
Linguistics
Alshammari, Wafi
The Development of and Accommodation in Gulf Pidgin Arabic: Verbal and Pronominal Form Selection
School of Global & International Studies, Room 1118
Chair: Prof. Joseph Clancy Clements, (812-855-7447)

Monday, April 23, 2018, 11:00 am
Communication & Culture
Gilmore, James
Knowing the Everyday: Wearable Technologies and the Informatic Domain
Franklin Hall, Room M030M
Chair: Prof. Stephanie DeBoer, (812-856-3708)

Monday, April 23, 2018, 12:15 pm
Political Science
Stone, Jason
Reaching Beyond the Village: Civic Activism and Insurgent Mobilization in Deeply-Divided Societies
Woodburn Hall, Room 220A
Chair: Prof. Jacob Bielasiak / Prof. Gardner Bovingdon, (812-855-5662 / 812-856-0230)

Monday, April 23, 2018, 2:00 pm
History
Foss, Sarah
Until the Indian is Made to Walk: Indigenismo and Development in Cold War Guatemala
Ballantine Hall, Room 704
Chair: Prof. Jeffrey Gould, (812-855-6934)

Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 2:30 pm
Economics
Lee, Ryan
Essays in Trade Agreements and Trade Networks
Wylie Hall, Room 225
Chair: Prof. Mostafa Beshkar / Prof. Volodymyr Lugovskyy, (812-855-6383 / 812-856-4594)

Thursday, April 26, 2018, 2:00 pm
Microbiology
Morton, Robert
A new phosphorelay that positively regulates swarming motility and negatively regulates holdfast production in Caulobacter crescentus
Woodburn Hall, Room 120
Chair: Prof. Yves Brun, (812-855-8860)

Friday, April 27, 2018, 12:15 pm
Microbiology
McCully, Alexandra
Characterization of metabolic interactions within a model microbial mutualism
Simon Hall, Room001
Chair: Prof. James McKinlay, (812-855-0359)

Tuesday, May 01, 2018, 2:30 pm
Speech & Hearing Sciences
Factor, Laiah
The Differential Facilitative Effects of Gesture and General Cognitive Mechanisms on Foreign Language Lexical Acquisition in School-Aged Children
Speeach & Hearing Sciences, Room C108
Chair: Prof. Raquel Anderson, (812-855-4161)

Wednesday, May 09, 2018, 2:30 pm
History
Antone, Marc
Ethnic Violence, Law, and Authoritarianism in Nineteenth-Century Mexico
Ballantine Hall, Room 704
Chair: Prof. Peter Guardino, (812-855-6108)

Thursday, May 10, 2018, 10:00 am
Economics
Park, Kwangyong
Essays on Monetary and Fiscal Policy under Imperfect Information
Wylie Hall, Room 225
Chair: Prof. Eric Leeper, (812-855-9157)

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, GRADUATE DIVISION

Monday, March 19, 2018, 10:00 am
Curriculum & Instruction
Howard, Kimberly
THROUGH THEIR LENSES: PRESERVICE TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE VALUE OF THEIR INTERNATIONAL TEACHING EXPERIENCES
Wright School of Education, Room 4204
Chair: Prof. David Flinders, (812-856-8189)

Monday, April 02, 2018, 9:00 am
Instructional Systems Technology
Ozdemir, Ozgur
Open textbook adoption: Enhancing the understanding of open textbook experiences of college faculty teaching in different settings
Wright School of Education, Room 2140
Chair: Prof. Curtis Bonk, (812-322-2878)

Tuesday, April 03, 2018, 10:00 am
Higher Education
Lozano, Jonathan
Student Trustees in the United States: Exploring the Foundations and Issues of Student Involvement in Public Higher Education Governance
Wright School of Education, Room 2102
Chair: Prof. Alexander McCormick, (812-856-4435)

Friday, April 06, 2018, 2:00 pm
Learning & Developmental Sciences
McKeown, Jessica
A Longitudinal Examination of Nature of Science Understandings Over a Decade: Change Between Grades Two and Twelve
Wright School of Education, Room 4204
Chair: Prof. Cindy Hmelo-Silver, (812-856-8335)

Monday, April 09, 2018, 10:00 am
History, Philosophy, & Policy in Education
Kearl, Benjamin
'Through a Thorough Individualized IEP Process': A Genealogical Policy Study of Special Education, Race, Disability, and Whiteness
Wright School of Education, Room 2277
Chair: Prof. Dionne Danns / Prof. Luise McCarty, (812-856-8398 / 812-856-8385)

Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 2:00 pm
Higher Education
Shuck, Johari
Legacy in Black and Blue: A Historical Examination of the Experiences of Black Football Players at the University of Michigan 1968-2004
IUPUI School of Education, ES 3138E
Chair: Prof. Dionne Danns / Prof. Robin Hughes, (812-856-8398 / 317-274-6817)

Monday, April 23, 2018, 2:00 pm
Higher Education
Wheatle, Katherine
Ward of the State: The Politics of Funding Maryland's Black Land-Grant College, 1886 - 1939
Wright School of Education, Room 4214
Chair: Prof. Andrea Walton, (812-345-9281)

Monday, April 23, 2018, 2:30 pm
Curriculum and Instruction
Kim, Geena
“Because the United States is a great melting pot”: The influence of students’ sociocultural backgrounds on understanding world history
Wright School of Education, Room 2277
Chair: Prof. Keith Barton, (812-340-0425)

Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 10:00 am
Learning & Developmental Sciences
Rehak, Andrea
Becoming and being an INSPIRE student: Learning, participation, and engagement in a Living-Learning Community
Wright School of Education, Room 2277
Chair: Prof. Cindy Hmelo-Silver, (812-856-8335)

SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS, COMPUTING, AND ENGINEERING, GRADUATE DIVISION

Tuesday, March 27, 2018, 2:00 pm
Information Science
Zoss, Angela
Network Visualization Literacy: Task, Context, and Layout
Luddy Hall, Vizualization Lab, Room 4012
Chair: Prof. Katy Borner, (812-855-3256)

Thursday, March 29, 2018, 3:30 pm
Computer Science
Xu, Tian
Intelligence with Interaction: Understanding Coordinated Behaviors with Developmental, Computational and Robotic Approaches
Psychology, Room 230
Chair: Prof. David Crandall / Prof. Chen Yu, (812-856-1115 / 812-856-0838)

Tuesday, April 03, 2018, 9:30 am
Computer Science
Peng, Zong
CLOUD-BASED SERVICE FOR ACCESS OPTIMIZATION TO TEXTUAL BIG DATA
Informatics West, Room 232
Chair: Prof. Beth Plale, (812-855-4373)

Friday, April 13, 2018, 3:30 pm
Informatics
MacLeod, Haley
Rare World: Investigating Social Support in Rare Disease and Common Chronic Illness Communities
Informatics West, Room 232
Chair: Prof. Kay Connelly / Prof. Katie Siek, (812-855-0739 / 812-856-0598)

THE MEDIA SCHOOL, GRADUATE DIVISION

Wednesday, March 28, 2018, 1:30 pm
Mass Communication (Telecommunications)
Bas, Ozen
The Potential of Twitter Images for Galvanizing Citizens to Collective Action
Franklin Hall, Room 330F
Chair: Prof. Maria Grabe, (812-856-1466)

Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 9:00 am
Mass Communication (Telecommunication)
Read-Bullock, Glenna
Social identity in advertising: News stories, phenotypic prototypicality, and model identity influence cognitive processing and evaluation of advertisements
Franklin Hall, Room 0030M
Chair: Prof. Robert Potter, (812-856-2546)

Monday, April 23, 2018, 10:00 am
Mass Communications
Park, Young Eun
Co-creation, Crowdsourcing, and Corporate Social Responsibility
Franklin Hall, Room 230M
Chair: Prof. Sung-Un Yang, (812-855-0078)

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, GRADUATE DIVISION

Friday, June 29, 2018, 1:00 pm
Physiology
Tang, Jessica
Epigenetic targeting of adipocytes inhibits high-grade serous ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion
Jordan Hall, Room 009
Chair: Prof. Kenneth Nephew, (812-855-9445)

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, GRADUATE DIVISION

Tuesday, March 20, 2018, 9:30 am
Public Affairs
Gopalan, Sandilya
Examining the Disparities in Non-Cognitive Educational Outcomes in the US
SPEA, DCR 300
Chair: Prof. Maureen Pirog, (812-855-0732)

Thursday, March 22, 2018, 3:30 pm
Public Affairs
Bullinger, Lindsey
The Impact of Social Policy on Child and Family Health and Well-Being in the United States
SPEA, Room 300
Chair: Prof. Maureen Pirog / Prof. Kosali Simon, (812-855-0732 / 812-856-3850)

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Monday, March 26, 2018, 9:00 am
Leisure Behavior
Kang, Sangguk
EXAMINING THE INFLUENCE OF FUTURE TIME PERSPECTIVE ON OLDER ADULT’S TRAVEL BEHAVIOR
School of Public Health, Dean's Conference Room, Room 107
Chair: Prof. Shu Cole, (812-855-9037)

Friday, March 30, 2018, 1:30 pm
Epidemiology
Arnaez, James
A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Depression Stigma and Barriers to Seeking Mental Health Care: Evidence for Effect Modification by Depression Severity, Cultural Background, and Gender
School of Public Health, Dean's Conference Room, Room 107
Chair: Prof. Andrea Chomistek, (812-856-7779)

Thursday, April 05, 2018, 11:00 am
Leisure Behavior
Dawson, Shay
PSYCHOSOCIAL EFFECT OF A YEAR ROUND MENTORING & ONLINE SUPPORT PROGRAM FOR ADOLESCENTS WITH PHYSICAL DISABILITIES ATTENDING A RESIDENTIAL MEDICAL CAMP
School of Public Health, Room C-013
Chair: Prof. Bryan McCormick, (812-855-3482)

Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 1:00 pm
Human Performance
Singleton, Braden
DOES THE EFFICACY OF TWO EVIDENCE-BASED MOVEMENT BASELINE SCREENING PROTOCOLS COUPLED WITH INJURY PREDICTION SOFTWARE PREDICT TIME-LOSS INJURY?
School of Public Health, Room C013
Chair: Prof. Dave Koceja , (812-855-7302)

© Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D., C.Psych., Former Research Director, Graduate Program in Counselling Psychology, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, Canada


Use the following steps when preparing for the oral defense of your thesis/dissertation.

1. Evaluation of oral examination is based on your presentation and your answers to questions from the examining committee.

2. Be well prepared for your presentation—academically, mentally and physically. Try to be well rested and focused before your oral defense.

3. In your preparation, don’t try to memorize all the studies cited in your thesis, but you do need to know the details of the few key studies that form the basis of your investigation.

4. You need to be familiar with larger issues, such as the basic assumptions, theoretical framework, paradigm, cross-cultural perspectives, Christian integration, etc.

5. More importantly, you need to have a deep understanding of the nature of your research problem and the major issues involved.

6. You may bring with you important materials for easy reference in the course of your defense; these may include key articles, computer print-outs of results, etc.

7. Your presentation is evaluated in terms of content and clarity as well as style.

8. Don’t speak too fast and don’t read from your notes.

9. Treat your presentation as a public address because there may be non-psychologists present at your defense. Therefore, don’t use too many jargons and don’t pack it with details. You need to tell people in simple, concise language:

  1. What you did,
  2. Why you did it,
  3. How you did it,
  4. What you found, and
  5. What the results mean.

10. Prepare handouts or power-points. Typically, they should include

  1. An overview or outline of your presentation,
  2. Introduction (including research question, rationale and hypothesis, if any, and definition of key constructs),
  3. Method (including design, methodology, sample, instruments or questionnaires, and procedure,
  4. Results (including tables or figures summarizing your findings), and
  5. Discussion (including reasons for new or unexpected findings, contributions and limitations, and practical implications).

11. Make sure that you space yourself well. Don’t spend too much time on one section. For example, you should not spend more than 5 minutes on introduction, since you are allowed only 20 minutes for your presentation.

12. Most of the questions are rather general and broad, dealing with substantial methodological, theoretical and application issues. However, some questions focus on specific points regarding sampling, statistical analysis, or some questionable conclusions.

13. Be prepared to clarify or elaborate on your assumptions, theoretical positions, methods, and conclusions. Often, an examiner plays the devil’s advocate to see how well you can think on your feet and defend yourself.

14. Occasionally, an examiner may ask a question which is unfair or cannot be adequately answered. After a few futile attempts, feel free to say that you don’t know the answer. You may even be bold enough to say, “Since none of my answers are acceptable, I would really appreciate it if you could give me some pointers or tell me what would be a correct answer.”

15. Here are some common questions:

  1. If you were to do it all over again, what changes would you make?
  2. What specific aspects of your findings can be utilized by counselors or psychologists in their practice?
  3. What is the most important contribution of your thesis? Can you say it in one or two sentences?
  4. What are some of the competing hypotheses? Could you think of an alternative interpretation of your findings?

16. Don’t rush to any answers. It is perfectly acceptable to think for a couple of seconds, or ask if you are on the right track. If you are not clear about the question, you are entitled to ask for clarification.

17. Try to be concise and to the point, but at the same time demonstrate that you have a good grasp of the complex issues involved. In other words, do not give superficial answers, but at the same time, do not go all over the map.

18. Put up a good defense without being defensive. Be confident without being cocky. A good defense means that you can provide strong logical arguments as well as empirical support o defend your position or conclusion. However, don’t be defensive when people criticize your study. If they are able to point out some real flaws or weaknesses in your study, accept their criticisms with humility, grace and gratitude.

19. Before the oral defense, talk to your advisor about areas of concerns based on external examiner’s comments. Then, discuss with your advisor how to best address these concerns. (Your advisor cannot tell you the specific questions the examiners will ask, but s/he can direct your attention to issues or areas that require some thinking or additional research.)

20. After the oral defense, meet with your advisor for debriefing and seek advice on how to revise your thesis.

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