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Dentistry Personal Statement Advice

Dentistry Personal Statement

As part of the Dentistry application process, you need to write a short essay about yourself on your UCAS form, known as a Dentistry personal statement. The purpose of a Dentistry personal statement is to tell the Universities that you’re applying to all about yourself, and to persuade them that you are a great candidate to study Dentistry.

This page covers the key information on how to write a  great Dentistry personal statement, as well as a step-by-step guide on how to actually write one!

What is a Dentistry Personal Statement?

UCAS describes the personal statement as an “opportunity to sell yourself to your prospective school, college or training provider”, which in this case would be the dental schools you are applying to. You need to show that you have the key qualities to study Dentistry and that you have knowledge of the career. Your Dentistry personal statement can be up to 4,000 characters, which is around 500 words or 47 lines of size 12 script.

As the length is highly restricted you need to be precise and use key unique selling points to get ahead of the competition.

What Should My Dentistry Personal Statement Include?

Your personal statement should cover three main areas:

  1. Motivation – Why do you want to study Dentistry?
  2. Exploration – What have you done to learn about Dentistry?
  3. Suitability – What skills do you have that make you a good fit for Dentistry?

How Should I Structure My Personal Statement?

Dentistry Personal statements vary greatly and don’t have to follow a strict structure. However, you need to make sure that your personal statement flows and follows a logical framework. We would suggest using the structure below as a starting point to ensure all the key points are covered. In brackets, we state the main theme for that section of the Dentistry personal statement.

  • Why I want to study Dentistry (motivation)
  • Work experience (exploration)
  • Volunteering (exploration)
  • Wider reading and study (exploration)
  • Extracurricular activities (suitability)
  • Conclusion (motivation)

What You Need To Do:

  1. Keep a reflective diary and make sure that it is kept up to date. Using the free personal portfolio is a good way to do this. This will be used to keep track of key skills and activities to include in your personal statement.
  2. Plan your structure clearly. The above suggested structure can be used but you might want to make alterations. Just ensure that it is clear and follows a logical progression.
  3. Start drafting. Make notes for each of the sections in your structure. Write down key points from your portfolio that relate to each section. It doesn’t matter if the personal statement is too long, because it can always be edited later on.
  4. Edit and refine. Begin to fine tune your draft and make sure that it fits the required writing style and word count for UCAS.
  5. Get advice. Once you are happy with your Dentistry personal statement, get other to give you feedback. This is so you can make further improvements. It is always worth asking friends, family and teachers!
  6. Get a professional review. Send your personal statement to The Medic Portal for professional feedback. Take this feedback on board and make the required edits. Then repeat step 5.
  7. Upload and submit. Transfer the final version from Word onto the UCAS website personal statement section. As there is no spell check on UCAS, Word should be used before submission.

Learn More:

Editors note: This article has been updated April 2017 and all the information in it is up to date

“Your Personal Statement should address why you desire to pursue a dental education and how a dental degree contributes to your personal and professional goals.”

What Does a “Losing” Personal Statement Look Like?

After this open-ended statement on the AADSAS dental school application lies a blank box for you to wow admissions committees with your courageous goals and impressive abilities. Undoubtedly, filling in the 4,500 characters of your personal statement is an intimidating task. Although you have a lot of information to cover, don’t get overwhelmed. If you follow these steps, you can write a unique, impressive dental school personal statement in no time.

To write a winning dental school personal statement you need to first avoid all of the errors that transform so many essays into unimpressive “losing” essays A “losing” personal statement is:

  • Generic: Here’s the test to see if your essay is generic and unoriginal. Cover up your name at the top of the page and ask yourself: “Is there anything in this personal statement that is unique to me, or could it have been written by any pre-dent?”
  • Safe: A safe essay has shares no vision of the future, gives no promises, shows no ambition and no passion. A safe essay relies on discussion of your past experiences rather than expectations of your future career.
  • Restrained: All the ‘blood’ — the joy, excitement, and enthusiasm — is drained out of a restrained essay. My favorite example is an essay that says ‘being a dentist won’t suck as much as my original plan of engineering.’

Three Main Goals For Your Personal Statement

Your personal statement has three main goals:

  1. It tells the committee why you want to be a dentist
  2. Your essay proves that your experiences have prepared you for dental school
  3. It shows that you have the qualities that will make you a successful dentist.

Start by asking yourself a few important questions. “How will dental school help me fulfill my dreams?” “How do my academic work, my community involvement, my clinical experiences, and my future ambitions all relate to dentistry?”

Paint a Vivid Picture in Your Essay

After you have answered these questions, it’s time to show, not tell. Find stories from your past experiences that will illustrate these ideas. Ask yourself, “What stories demonstrate that I already have a head start on developing the skills of a competent and caring dentist?” You don’t want to start your essay with, “I desire to pursue a dental education because of a, b, and c.” Start with a bang— immediately pull the reader into an engaging story.

Effective statements weave together two or thre e personal anecdotes that illustrate why you want to be a dentist—and why you would make a good dentist. To find your stories, think about aspects from your background that relate to dentistry. What patient contact experiences have you had? Think about one specific patient you showed compassion to or helped. When have you been a leader? Strong leadership stories can come out of group projects, clubs, sports teams, tutoring, being a TA, work, etc. What accomplishments have you achieved? Achievements can range from research projects to job performance to advancement in club leadership. Admissions committees love diverse applicants. What are your talents? Playing the guitar or sculpting not only shows that you’re well-rounded, but also that you work well with your hands—an integral skill for a dentist.

Passion Wins — Don’t Hold Back

The best stories show your readers, rather than tell them about your experiences and qualities. Write about pivotal moments by zooming in on the action. Be descriptive and creative. If you write, “I feel that I can be truly compassionate when a patient is in pain,” you are telling your reader something. If you write, “As tears rolled down the girl’s cheeks, I found myself grabbing her hand. I wanted to keep her from squirming. I squeezed her hand tighter and looked her in the eye,” you are showing your reader how you are compassionate when a patient is in pain. Paint pictures for your reader. Anchor images in their mind with descriptions and dialogue. Detail not only makes your writing more interesting, but it also shows that you have an observant mind—and a good memory.

Tired Themes That Kill Your Essay

Although there is no formula for a winning statement, there are some tired themes to stay away from. First, don’t just say you “want to help people.” It is assumed that every potential dentist would like to help his or her patients. Although a good motive, the admissions officers will have read hundreds of these “I want to help people” essays.

How will you stand out? The second essay to avoid is the “I want to be a dentist because one or both of my parents are dentists.” Perhaps the fact that you were raised in this kind of environment swayed you to follow in the family line, but don’t make this your whole reason for pursuing dentistry. You need to have your own passions and career goals.

Finally, you don’t want to re-write your resume. Don’t begin your essay with, “Since I was three, I’ve always wanted to become a dentist,” and go on to elementary school, high school, and college accomplishments. A chronological list of events does not show your personality or highlight your most recent and relevant experiences.

Piecing it All Together

Once you find your two to three stories, it’s time to organize them into essay form with good flow and consistency. Your stories do not have to be in chronological order, but they do need to be connected. Consider your anecdotes and write about the insight you gained from each that will make you a better dentist. Next, work on transitional sentences to link the stories. Think about how the stories relate and pull them together with a few transitional sentences. Finally, write a conclusion.

Ways to draw your statement to a close are: bringing back an element of your opening story or summarizing how your experiences have prepared you for dentistry. Before writing the conclusion, read your statement through a couple times to see what overall impression you get. You might even need to walk away for an hour and read it again. Then you’ll be ready to write a strong, cohesive conclusion for your personal statement.

Your first draft should be between 5,500-6,000 characters (including spaces). This way, by the time that you finish editing and revising, your statement should be at its appropriate length of 4,500 characters or less. During the revising process, cut filler words and repetitive content. Don’t use excessive wordiness such as, “I found myself with an opportunity to be able to assist the dentist with the first patient he had in the morning.” This sentence can simply be cut to: “I assisted the dentist with his first patient of the morning.” Good writing is made up of the three c’s: clear, concise, and cohesive.

Use Your Own Natural Voice – It’s beautiful!

Finally, write as you speak instead of affecting a formal, academic tone that you would use for a college paper. Writing your personal statement is your chance to express yourself in your own words. Don’t try to impress the admissions committees by writing what you think they want to hear, or pulling out a thesaurus and using grandiose words to sound smart. You want your personal voice to shine through and the stories of your life to give admissions officers a sense of who you are. The ultimate goal of your personal statement is to interest the committee enough to interview you—and the committee wants to interview a person, not an academic essay.

A very useful shortcut is to model your essay after the winning essays of other students who were accepted to dental school. Check out the dental school personal statement sample below: It’s an essay written by a real dental school applicant, with my personal annotations to the side. See how this applicant was able to write a winning dental school personal statement.

How to get help on your essay

Brainstorming, drafting, writing, and editing your essay may seem like an overwhelming project, but there are a few ways for you to get help that

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